In my last post about this project, Necia commented on the way garter stitch eats up yarn, especially in bulky, which I think is true. You get a firmer fabric, so it makes sense that it takes up more yarn. Plus, she mentioned that spinning with more twist per inch than commercial yarn eats up more roving too, and those two points probably sum up the reason I ran out of yarn after a pound of roving spun up into about 460 yards..Anyway, Amy of Spunky Eclectic tried valiantly to get me more roving in time for Christmas, and she did get it to me in a timely fashion, but I was so swamped with other holiday stuff that I just didn’t get it done. But now I’ve finished knitting the pattern. I hereby present my garter stitch blob:

Garter Stitch Blob

And surprise! It’s a jacket!

Surprise!  A jacket!

I’ve seen other pretty Baby Surprise Jackets with i-cord or crochet trim, but I like the way it looks “unfinished,” plus I don’t want to add to the weight of an already heavy garment. So I decided on a no-frills shoulder seam. Since I have no experience seaming horizontal to vertical garter stitch, I searched around online for guidance. The most helpful article I found was a post by the Yarn Harlot which showed pictures of the way she stitched each side. I had more vertical garter ribs than horizontal bumps, so I stitched two vertical stitches together a few times on each side. Here’s how it looks:

Shoulder seam

Now with the shoulders seamed up, I was able to put it on my victim finally! Luckily, he put it on willingly, since he’s seen me working on it and is old enough to understand what it’s for. And he likes it!

He likes it!

The fit in the body is surprisingly generous, but the sleeves are really short. I will be lengthening them, for sure. Plus, I haven’t bought buttons yet. I really need to find a good place to buy buttons. I ended up buying cheap buttons at Walmart as temporary ones for my Tilted Duster, to be replaced when I find prettier ones.

Dancing in his surprise jacket

Here’s a side/back view:

Side/back view

And here’s one I just couldn’t resist. Please don’t be offended. He doesn’t mean it!

Oops!  An unintended rude gesture

Final blocking before wearing. Mainly to correct the major stockinette curling of the sides. It worked beautifully!

This was the first project I’ve done which really required seaming. I just used the Peruvia to seam, and despite the fact that it’s a soft single ply, I didn’t have any problems with the yarn breaking or shedding.  The side seams (above) were mattress stitch, and the armhole seams (below) were a combination of vertical to horizontal weaving and mattress stitch. I am really proud of them!

Here’s another view of my mattress stitch below. Edith (our au pair) commented that the garment looked cute as a vest and said I should just stop there! But my butt gets cold, so I continued on..

Blocking front and back pieces prior to seaming. I used my handy-dandy blocking wires and some interlocking foam rubber tiles as my board.

Here are the sleeves, knit both at once on a long circular. Much better than having to seam them! I made them an inch longer than recommended in the pattern.

Gauge swatch for the Tilted Duster. Interestingly, I had to go down two needle sizes to an 8 to get gauge. Usually, I’m a tight knitter and have to go up!